31 May 2012 Last Updated: 29 October 2013

Full Lexus CT (11 on) Model Review

by Gareth Evans

  • We test the Lexus CT200h F-Sport Nav
  • Sporty looks but with low running costs
  • P11d value of £29,681 means low BIK
Lexus CT (11 on) 200h 1.8 F-Sport (Navigation) 5d CVT Auto - Road Test
You’re after a low-tax hatchback but fancy something a little different. All of your colleagues drive Ford Ecomotives and Volkswagen BlueMotions, but you want something that looks a bit sportier and has a few more toys to play with. If so, you could do a lot worse than checking out the Lexus CT200h F-Sport Nav.

You’re after a low-tax hatchback but fancy something a little different. All of your colleagues drive Ford Ecomotives and Volkswagen BlueMotions, but you want something that looks a bit sportier and has a few more toys to play with. If so, you could do a lot worse than checking out the Lexus CT200h F-Sport Nav.

The main differences between this and the common-or-garden CT200h are cosmetic. There’s a bodykit comprising a larger rear spoiler, side skirts, a mesh grille and revised front and rear bumpers. You also get a set of special 17-inch alloy wheels and a pair of electronically retractable door mirrors.

Inside there’s a host of tweaks to further accentuate the model’s sporting nature. There’s an exclusive F-Sport steering wheel, aluminium pedals and scuff plates.

The model we’ve tested also includes Lexus’ full Map Navigation Pack. This includes a 10-speaker audio system, a six-disc CD changer in the dash, a hard drive-based sat nav system, parking sensors and the firm’s Remote Touch Control system – which is how the driver interacts with the car.

Lexus has also made changes to the CT's suspension system to make the driving experience slightly sportier. Through a combination of tweaked spring rates and different shocks the ride is a tad firmer, but the car now handles far better through corners.

In terms of the drivetrain the F-Sport is identical to every other CT200h. That means a hybrid system combining a 1.8-litre petrol engine with an electric motor for a maximum output of 134bhp. This enables the hybrid Lexus to hit 62mph in 10.3 seconds and go on to a top speed of 113mph. It isn’t the most exciting drive in the world – largely thanks to the CVT transmission which takes a lot of the fun out of enthusiastic motoring – but can get a lick on if you really give the throttle a good hard poke.

More importantly for the company car driver, the hybrid system improves both CO2 emissions and range. The former figure is a paltry 94g/km, which means Benefit-in-Kind is payable at 10% for this year and next year, rising to 11% for the year after that. With a P11d value of £29,681 we’re looking at company car tax of £49 per month on the 20% pay scale and £99 on the 40% pay scale.

In terms of range, the CT200h has a claimed combined fuel economy figure of 68.9mpg and a fuel tank of 45 litres. This equates to over 680 miles between trips to the petrol station. We saw around 55mpg on our rather sedate test drive, which equates to a whisker less than 550 miles between fill-ups.

So, if you’re trying to stand out from the crowd in the car park catwalk but still want a car with low running costs, the F-Sport CT200h may well be the car you’re looking for.

Also consider:

Audi A3

The popular A3 has a range of extremely smooth and efficient diesel engines including one which is capable of 74mpg and 99g/km CO2 emissions.

Ford Focus

For many years one of the top-selling cars in the UK, the Focus is an extremely popular company car.

Alfa Romeo Giulietta

The left-field choice from Italy is a stylish hatchback which drives well and is available with a 1.6-litre diesel engine for low running costs.