05 February 2016

Full Mitsubishi L200 (15 on) Model Review

by Liam Campbell, Van Editor

Mitsubishi L200 4Life
  • Mitsubishi L200 4Life
  • Mitsubishi L200 4Life
  • Mitsubishi L200 4Life
  • Mitsubishi L200 4Life
  • Lots of equipment and very economical
  • Poor towing capacity and load area dimensions
  • Competitively priced at just £19,749 plus VAT
Mitsubishi L200 (15 on) 2.5 DI-D (151bhp) Double Cab DI-D 4Life 4WD - Road Test
When Mitsubishi launched the all-new L200 in the summer of 2015 we were impressed by the increased levels of refinement, handling and comfort.

When Mitsubishi launched the all-new L200 in the summer of 2015 we were impressed by the increased levels of refinement, handling and comfort.

So far, we’ve only reviewed the higher-end versions but after months of trying, we’ve finally got our hands on a base-spec Mitsubishi L200 4Life model.

Mitsubishi L200 4Life

Entry-level trims used to constitute nearly all new pickup sales, but since the tax changes in 2000, higher-end versions like the Mitsubishi L200 Barbarian have gone on to make-up around 90 percent of sales. For a select few, though, the stripped-down pickups are essential as a cost-effective work tool.

In the cab

While the 4Life may not look much from the outside with its black plastic door handles and grille, the cab does boast a decent amount of kit. The interior feels very spacious with its low-set dashboard and is very accommodating thanks to the full-adjustable driver’s seat and steering column.

Mitsubishi L200 4Life

The cab is very tidy and features a number of creature comforts like air-con, cruise control and remote central locking. Entertainment is provided by a standard stereo system, although it comes with steering wheel-mounted controls, a CD player, USB port and Bluetooth connectivity.

Loading and towing

Common criticisms of the previous generation Mitsubishi L200 that seem to have been carried forward to the new model are its loading and towing attributes. The load area is smaller than most others in this segment, measuring just 1,470mm squared, with 465mm-high side walls. One of the advantages on the 4Life spec is that the rear tailgate can drop open to 150 degrees which allows for easier loading and unloading in tight spaces – higher-spec models are limited to 90 degrees because of the rear bumper.

Mitsubishi L200 4Life

Similarly, the towing capacity is pretty poor. Despite featuring heavy-duty leaf-spring suspension on the rear axle the maximum trailer weight on the new L200 has improved only slightly from three tonnes to 3.1, although it can still carry 990kg while pulling a full load.   

On the road

In line with the rest of the industry, Mitsubishi has downsized the L200’s engine displacement to 2.4-litres. This produces 151bhp and 380Nm of torque, while returning an impressive 44.1mpg on the official test.

Mitsubishi L200 4Life

It certainly pulls away a lot stronger than most others in its class but acceleration beyond 2,500rpm revs is slow which makes overtaking a chore. In the bends, the L200 still generates a lot of bodyroll but the steering is a lot more accurate and precise than ever.

Pricing and summary

There’s not much to dislike about the new Mitsubishi L200; it’s very economical, it’s stylish, there’s a lot of specification as standard and, priced at just £19,749, it represents one of the best-value pickups on UK roads.

The main drawback to the L200 is its productivity. The 4Life is aimed towards the utilitarian end of the market, yet the L200 falls short of the 3.5-tonne towing capacity and 2.25 square-metre load area that most workhorses are offering nowadays.

Instead, we'd recommend the Ford Ranger and Isuzu D-Max for commercial buyers, as they have larger load areas and bigger towing capacities.