17 March 2017

Full Mitsubishi L200 (15 on) Model Review

by CJ Hubbard, Vans Editor

Road test review of the Mitsubishi L200 Warrior
  • Road test review of the Mitsubishi L200 Warrior
  • Road test review of the Mitsubishi L200 Warrior
  • Road test review of the Mitsubishi L200 Warrior
  • Road test review of the Mitsubishi L200 Warrior
  • Road test review of the Mitsubishi L200 Warrior
  • Road test review of the Mitsubishi L200 Warrior
  • Road test review of the Mitsubishi L200 Warrior
  • Double cab lifestyle pickup majors on value
  • £24,949 (plus VAT) with auto 'box and loads of kit
  • Less impressive payload and towing capacity
Mitsubishi L200 (15 on) 2.5 DI-D (178bhp) LB Double Cab DI-D Warrior 4WD Auto - Road Test
The L200 Warrior is the second rung on the lifestyle ladder for Mitsubishi’s fifth-generation pickup truck, sitting above Titan but below Barbarian at the top of the range.

The L200 Warrior is the second rung on the lifestyle ladder for Mitsubishi’s fifth-generation pickup truck, sitting above Titan but below Barbarian at the top of the range.

Available exclusively in the double cab bodystyle – you’ll have to go for the basic 4Life specification if you want a single or extended ‘Club’ cab – Warrior is also a strong candidate for the L200 sweet spot in terms of value for money.

The equipment list is vast, with luxuries such as keyless go, dual-zone climate control, heated seats, reversing camera and satellite-navigation fitted as standard. Given that the L200 in general is arguably the best-value pickup currently available, this makes the Warrior a tempting choice indeed.

Mitsubishi L200 Warrior performance and driving experience

While you’re never going to mistake one of these for a car from behind the wheel, the L200 driving experience is full of far more positives than negatives.

Road test review of the Mitsubishi L200 Warrior

Bad news first. The ride is rather shuddery when you’re running unladen – which probably means it’s fine if you’re a builder but might be a bit annoying on the school run.

With rear suspension designed to cope with a tonne, this is always going to be an issue on a pickup, though rivals such as the (more expensive) Nissan Navara and (much more expensive) Volkswagen Amarok do deal with the problem better.

The good news is that refinement is excellent. The Warrior’s 181hp 2.4-litre turbodiesel – now upgraded to meet Euro 6 emissions regulations – is among the most civil-sounding engines of any pickup. It’s smooth right through the rev-range, and with 430Nm of torque (pulling power) available 1,500-2,500rpm feels immediately muscular as well.

That said, the L200’s 3,100kg maximum towing capacity is some way short of the 3,500kg class best.

Similarly, the optional auto gearbox fitted here only has five speeds – at least one less than almost every automatic pickup alternative. Paying the extra for the auto does get rid of one of the L200’s other weak points, though: the ponderously awkward six-speed manual transmission.

Road test review of the Mitsubishi L200 Warrior

All told however, if you can put up with the niggly ride, you’ll find this is a surprisingly good thing to drive. The front end is very positive, with loads of grip making it keen to change direction, helped by nicely judged steering and very well controlled body roll for a truck.

We didn’t try this example off-road, but we know from previous drives that the L200 is a good performer in this area. Lifestyle models like the Warrior get Mitsubishi’s fancier four-way adjustable Super Select four-wheel drive system as standard.

How lifestyle is it inside?

The interior design probably isn’t going to be your major reason for purchase.

While there’s plenty of room in both rows of seats – the double cab body means four doors and five seatbelts – the L200’s cabin is plain to look at and packed with plastics that are never going to trouble the dictionary definition of plush.

Road test review of the Mitsubishi L200 Warrior

Utilitarian is the word that springs to mind, despite the Warrior’s leather upholstery. But at least the buttons are easy to find. And the steering wheel adjusts for both reach and rake, so you shouldn’t struggle to find a comfortable driving position. Warrior includes electric operation for the driver’s seat, too.

L200 Warrior standard equipment

Over compensating for the materials and the boring appearance, the Warrior does come loaded with kit. These items are just the highlights:

We did find the infotainment system a bit fiddly – but less so than the system used by Fiat in the otherwise nearly identical Fullback pickup (which is based on the L200) – and the Lane Departure Warning system quickly gets annoying.

Especially since you have to switch it off every time you get in the vehicle.

L200 load area dimensions and practicality

The L200 doesn’t have the biggest of load areas – even for a double cab pickup. Here are the major dimensions:

  • Maximum load length: 1,520mm (at the floor; 1,470mm elsewhere)
  • Maximum load width: 1,470mm
  • Width between the wheel arches: 1,085mm
  • Side-wall height: 475mm
  • Cargo floor loading height: 850mm

As already mentioned, the 3,100kg towing capacity is also somewhat limited – though compensation comes from legally being able to carry up to 990kg in the load bed while towing to that maximum.

Road test review of the Mitsubishi L200 Warrior

Basic outright payload capacity is 1,050kg, however, which is again bettered by almost everything else in class – in spite of being 5kg more than the manual gearbox version.

Running costs

Going for the automatic transmission dents the official fuel economy, reducing it by 2.1mpg to 37.7mpg; in reality you’ll be lucky to top 30mpg, but the auto may save you on clutch-replacement costs, especially if you do a lot of stop-start driving. There’s a reason many urban delivery services buy automatics.

The L200 meets Euro 6 without using an AdBlue tank, so you don’t have the extra expense of keeping that topped up.

Servicing is every 12,500 miles or 12 months – not especially impressive for a commercial vehicle, but not unusual for a pickup.

Road test review of the Mitsubishi L200 Warrior

The warranty is five years or 62,500 miles; it can be extended to 125,000 miles for a surprisingly small fee (£350 plus VAT at the at the time of writing).

Verdict

While it doesn’t excel in absolute practicality terms, the impressive amount of standard equipment, the refined driving experience and the sheer value for money make the Mitsubishi L200 Warrior a superbly well-rounded choice of pickup.

There are more comfortable rivals, more stylish rivals and certainly rivals that can tow and carry greater loads. But all of them are also more expensive.

Also consider:

Ford Ranger – read the full review on Parkers Vans

Isuzu D-Max – read the full review on Parkers Vans

Fiat Fullback – read the full review on Parkers Vans

Also read:

New pickups coming soon on Parkers Vans

What Euro 6 means for van and pickup buyers

Everything you need to know about van and pickup taxation

The full Mistubishi L200 review on Parkers Vans