Small van depreciation: All major models compared

  • All nine mainstream small vans compared
  • Residual values carried out by Parkers Valuations teams
  • Average loss of £12,000 over first three years

Depreciation is the biggest contributor to the total cost of owning a small van during the first three years - more than the fuel, insurance and servicing costs combined. It'll cost you £12,000 on average.

If you're looking at a new small van, this article is a must-read. 

How we worked it out

To get a better understanding of the market, we compiled a list of all mainstream small panel vans. The residual values were carried out by the Parkers Valuations team, and we used a representative period of three years and 60,000 miles on the clock.

For each of the models stated, we used two derivatives: a base version with a low power rating and the top-of-the-range spec with the highest engine output. We then used the average of these two derivatives to give an indicative list price, an estimated future value and a depreciation amount (both percentage and actual value) for each model.

9 – Fiat Doblo Cargo

Fiat Doblo Cargo 1.3mJet panel van

Average list price: £16,698

Average depreciation: 20.5 percent

Value after three years/60,000 miles: £3,488

Amount lost in depreciation: £13,210

The worst small van for depreciation during the first three years, according to our report, is the Fiat Doblo Cargo. On average, more than £13,000 is written off the value of a Doblo (£16,698 list price versus £3,488 estimated future value) which can only be attributed to the poor perceived build quality of the previous generation.

Read the Fiat Doblo Cargo review.

8 – Vauxhall Combo

Vauxhall Combo

Average list price: £16,308

Average depreciation: 20.5 percent

Value after three years/60,000 miles: £3.350

Amount lost in depreciation: £12,958

Retaining the same 20.5 percent of its original value is the Doblo’s sister van, the Combo, with which it shares the same driveline and chassis. However, because the list price is lower (£16,308), the difference in value from new is around £250 less on the Vauxhall Combo.

Read the Vauxhall Combo review.

7 – Renault Kangoo

Renault Kangoo 2015

Average list price: £15,046

Average depreciation: 20.5 percent

Value after three years/60,000 miles: £3,138

Amount lost in depreciation: £11,908

The Renault Kangoo is the third vehicle to retain just 20.5 percent of its original list price after three years and 60,000 miles. The average value of £3,138 is £11,908 less than the list price of £15,046 which, again, can be blamed on the historical technical issues associated with the Kangoo.

Read the Renault Kangoo review.

6 – Mercedes-Benz Citan

Mercedes-Benz Citan

Average list price: £16,858

Average depreciation: 24.5 percent

Value after three years/60,000 miles: £4,200

Amount lost in depreciation: £12,658

Despite sharing the same chassis and driveline, the Mercedes-Benz Citan performs far better than its Renault-badged sibling, retaining 24.5 percent of its original list price. However, the customer will end up losing more money as the Mercedes-Benz Citan list price is £1,800 higher.

Read the Mercedes-Benz Citan review.

5 – Peugeot Partner

Peugeot Partner

Average list price: £15,006

Average depreciation: 25 percent

Value after three years/60,000 miles: £3,775

Amount lost in depreciation: £11,231

Achieving respectable mid-table status is the Peugeot Partner. After three years, around 25 percent of the list price should be maintained, which isn’t bad considering that Peugeot dealerships often offer big discounts on Partner vans.

Read the Peugeot Partner review.

4 – Citroen Berlingo (26 percent; £10,801 depreciation)

Citroen Berlingo

Average list price: £14,601

Average depreciation: 26 percent

Value after three years/60,000 miles: £3,800

Amount lost in depreciation: £10,801

The badge is all that physically separates the Citroen Berlingo and Peugeot Partner, but Citroen’s superior aftersales service (provided by the 80 Citroen Business Centres nationwide) could explain why used buyers are prepared to pay that bit extra.

Read the Citroen Berlingo review.

3 – Nissan NV200

Nissan NV200

Average list price: £14,913

Average depreciation: 28 percent

Value after three years/60,000 miles: £4,213

Amount lost in depreciation: £10,700

A surprise contender in the top three is the Nissan NV200. The NV200 is the only mainstream Asian-style van left in the UK after the Toyota Hiace was replaced in 2013, and with 28 percent residual values after three years, it shows that these high, nimble and load-efficient vans are in demand.

Read the Nissan NV200 review.

2 – Volkswagen Caddy

VW Caddy C4 Startline Euro 6

Average list price: £17,355

Average depreciation: 30 percent

Value after three years/60,000 miles: £5,213

Amount lost in depreciation: £12,142

After leading the residual values for many years, the Volkswagen Caddy has fallen into second place. This could be down to the fact that the model suffered as a result of the 2015 VW emission scandal and, for many years, from high running costs (see Cheapest Small Vans for Parts) – which may have dented the van’s image.

Read the Volkswagen Caddy review.

1 – Ford Transit Connect (31.5 percent; £11,209 depreciation)

Ford Transit Connect

Average list price: £16,347

Average depreciation: 31.5 percent

Value after three years/60,000 miles: £5,138

Amount lost in depreciation: £11,209

Achieving an impressive 31.5 percent of its original value and taking the title of ‘least depreciating van’ is the Ford Transit Connect. This generation is the most fuel-efficient in its class and one of the cheapest for parts and, in addition to offering high levels of comfort and refinement, means it’s the most desirable small van on sale.

Read the Ford Transit Connect review.