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Speeding fines - how much will you be charged?

  • How much will you get fined for speeding?
  • Regulations changed so your fine could be higher
  • Maximum fine increased by 50%

If you get caught speeding on a UK road, how much will you be fined? 

The UK’s Sentencing Council, which sets the guideline for the fines or other penalties handed out by magistrates courts, increased the maximum fine for the most serious speeding offences in 2017.

The changes, which came into effect on 24 April 2017, represent a 50% increase in the amount you can be fined in court for exceeding the posted speed limit.

The seriousness of the speeding offence remains determined by a set scale – which we’ve reproduced below – but shifts the worst offences into a Band C sentencing range from the previous Band B.

How much is a speeding fine in the UK?

You can expect to be fined 150% of your week’s salary if caught doing 51mph or above in a 30mph zone – up to a maximum of £1,000 (also known as a level 3 fine).

Get caught doing 101mph or more on the motorway, and the same rule applies but up to a maximum of £2,500 (a level 4 fine).

Such fines are in addition to the courts’ ability to impose penalty points on your licence or disqualify you from driving for a period of at least seven days.

Speeding fine calculator

Are there different fines for different speeds? Yes -  the amount you are fined, and the number of penalty points or length of driving ban you receive, is determined by how much faster than the speed limit you are going.

This is split into three Bands: A, B and C.

Under Band A, the court will start by considering a fine of 50% of your relevant weekly salary, though it has the power to impose a fine in the range of 25-75%. You will also receive three penalty points.

Band A speeding offences:

  • 21-30mph when the speed limit is 20mph
  • 31-40mph when the speed limit is 30mph
  • 41-55mph when the speed limit is 40mph
  • 51-65mph when the speed limit is 50mph
  • 61-80mph when the speed limit is 60mph
  • 71-90mph when the speed limit is 70mph

Under Band B, the starting point is 100% of your relevant weekly salary, with a range of 75-125%. The court will also impose between four and six penalty points or disqualify you from driving for seven to 28 days

Band B speeding offences:

  • 31-40mph when the speed limit is 20mph
  • 41-50mph when the speed limit is 30mph
  • 56-65mph when the speed limit is 40mph
  • 66-75mph when the speed limit is 50mph
  • 81-90mph when the speed limit is 60mph
  • 91-100mph when the speed limit is 70mph

Under Band C the starting point is 150% of your relevant weekly salary, with a range of 125-175%. The court will also impose either six penalty points or a seven to 56-day driving ban. However, the guidelines also explicitly state ‘Where an offender is driving grossly in excess of the speed limit the court should consider a disqualification in excess of 56 days’, so that’s not a set limit.

Band C speeding offences:

  • 41mph and above when the speed limit is 20mph
  • 51mph and above when the speed limit is 30mph
  • 66mph and above when the speed limit is 40mph
  • 76mph and above when the speed limit is 50mph
  • 91mph and above when the speed limit is 60mph
  • 101mph and above when the speed limit is 70mph

Will the court take anything else into account when deciding the fine and penalty for speeding?

The Sentencing Council guidelines recognise that there can be factors that both increase and reduce the seriousness of a speeding offence.

Among the things that will make the offence more serious include speeding in poor weather, the type of vehicle (speeding in a lorry is worse than speeding in a car due to the potential for damage), what’s on board (passengers, heavy load) and the location (if near a school, in traffic or where there are high numbers of pedestrians).

Things that may reduce the seriousness of the offence include having no previous convictions, ‘good character and/or exemplary conduct’ or a genuine emergency. Though it would be unwise to rely on any these as a certainty.

For more examples see the Sentencing Council’s own information on the 2017 speeding revisions by clicking here – but it says that even its own list is ‘non-exhaustive.’

Speeding fine codes on your licence

If you've been caught speeding, you'll see a new code on your driving licence: 

SP10 - Exceeding goods vehicle speed limits
SP20 - Exceeding speed limit for type of vehicle (excluding goods or passenger vehicles)
SP30 - Exceeding statutory speed limit on a public road
SP40 - Exceeding passenger vehicle speed limit
SP50 - Exceeding speed limit on a motorway