Parkers overall rating: 3.5 out of 5 3.5

Miles per pound (mpp) Miles per pound (mpp)

Reliable fuel consumption data for comparison purposes is not available for this model.

Fuel economy

A more stringent standard for fuel economy (WLTP) was introduced from September 2017, and this model was not required to undergo that test. Its fuel economy measured under the previous test system was 18 - 27 mpg. However these figures are less likely to be achievable in real world driving and so should never be compared to another car's mpg which was measured under the newer, more realistic WLTP system.

Early Grand Cherokees were very pricey from new and represented poor value for money, though this was addressed in 2006 with some hefty price cuts and better value Predator models. Fuel consumption and tax costs are high plus servicing the petrol models twice every 15,000 miles won’t be cheap either, so buyers will need deep pockets. The diesel is more economical, but with an average of just 28mpg it's less than impressive compared to other large diesel 4x4s.

Buyers in need of a heavy-duty off-roader tend to be hit with expensive road tax, as large 4x4s are thirsty and emit high levels of CO2. The Grand Cherokee is no different, with the hefty 4.7-litre and 5.7-litre petrol engines producing 352g/km CO2 and 366g/km CO2 respectively. That puts them well into the higher tax bands and both only return around 18mpg.

The 3.0-litre diesel fares slightly better - it manages 28mpg but although emissions are lower at 270g/km CO2, it's just as pricey to tax.

The Mercedes-Benz-developed diesel and relaxed American V8s with more frequent service intervals should mean few mechanical problems. Faults with the previous model were relatively few and the robust interior should stand up to wear and tear.

Ongoing running costs

Road tax (12 months) £330 - £580
See tax rates for all versions
Insurance group 34 - 41
How much is it to insure?