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View all Nissan 370Z reviews
Parkers overall rating: 4.5 out of 5 4.5

An anti-turbo, anti-refined coupe for rebellious drivers

Nissan 370Z Coupe (09 on) - rated 4.5 out of 5
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PROS

  • Fast
  • Fun
  • Good value
  • Non-turbo V6

CONS

  • Heavy controls
  • Boot space
  • Expensive Nismo
  • Lack of refinement

PROS

  • Fast
  • Fun
  • Good value
  • Non-turbo V6

CONS

  • Heavy controls
  • Boot space
  • Expensive Nismo
  • Lack of refinement

Nissan 370Z Coupe rivals

Nissan has a long heritage of building sharp handling Z-badged sports cars going back to the 1960s and this smart looking coupe is the current custodian of that moniker.

With a rumbling V6 engine, heavy manual gearchange and low-slung driving position it's very much in the mould of the old-testament two-seater performance coupes that precede it. 

In terms of performance it competes with top end models like the Porsche 718 Cayman, Audi TT and BMW 2 Series, but represents far better value for money.

Large displacement, naturally aspirated engine

There’s only one motor to choose from in the 370Z range – a larger than life 3.7-litre V6 with either 328- or 344hp depending on whether you pick the standard car or the Nismo-tuned version.

Either way it’s a big hearted unit with plenty of power on tap, plus a distinct lack of turbocharging - unlike the majority of its rivals. 

That gives it a different character to something like a Porsche 718 Cayman, which makes do with a smaller, less characterful powerplant.

Simple range to navigate

Only three trim levels exist in the Nissan 370Z range – the standard car, the GT and finally the Nismo-tweaked model.

Entry-level cars come with lots of kit, including 18-inch alloys, keyless entry and ignition, climate control and a limited-slip differential. 

Climbing up to GT adds things like sat-nav while the Nismo car comes with a particularly lairy looking bodykit and standout ducktail spoiler.

Old-school handling style

The Zed’s German rivals offer something more of a refined driving style, the 370Z is much more hairy chested, with heavy control weights and scruff-of-the-neck appeal.

It’s actually quite sophisticated in its handling however, with loads of grip thanks to a standard limited-slip differential. The traction control is also quite keen to step in when things start to get out of shape too.

In 2018 a new clutch was installed that promised a slightly lighter action and this has certainly helped the overall usability of the 370Z.

Nissan 370Z Coupe rivals

Other Nissan 370Z models: