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Parkers overall rating: 4 out of 5 4.0

Miles per pound (mpp) Miles per pound (mpp)

Petrol engines 6.4 - 7.3 mpp
Diesel engines 7.6 - 8.7 mpp
Low figures relate to the least economical version; high to the most economical. Based on WLTP combined fuel economy for versions of this car made since September 2017 only, and typical current fuel or electricity costs.
  • Three efficient diesel engines and two petrols
  • Impressively high claimed fuel economy figures
  • Shouldn’t be pricey to maintain, either

The Rifter’s engine range doesn’t include any kind of high-performance powertrains, so running costs across the range should be very manageable indeed for buyers.

While the PureTech 110 is expected to be a big seller, it’s the BlueHDi’s that will be cheapest to run when it comes to fuel costs due to the higher fuel claimed fuel economy figures.

BlueHDi running costs

The BlueHDi 75 diesel engine was short-lived and taken off sale by 2019, so you'll only find them in early used examples of the Rifter. Here, they claimed to return 68.9mpg (67.3mpg for cars with Grip Control fitted and on different tyres) on the now-defunct NEDC cycle, so we'd take these figures with a large pinch of salt.

If you're buying new, the BlueHDi 100 will claim to achieve fuel economy figures of between 42-50.6mpg on the latest WLTP system, with the most powerful BlueHDi 130 diesel claiming around 45.2-50.1mpg. Figures for the EAT8-equipped BlueHDi 130 show a similar 45.1-50.3mpg.

2018 Peugeot Rifter GT Line, side

Despite the extra performance, the claimed average fuel consumption achieves a higher minimum mpg figure and we suspect that's because the extra power and torque makes lighter work of low-speed driving conditions. Having the extra sixth gear will also help this, but the claimed figures should also be more attainable during ownership as the engine won't have to work as hard to get up to speed.

PureTech running costs

Fuel economy figures for the PureTech 110 engine range from 36.7-43.5mpg.  

CO2 emissions

If you're choosing a BlueHDi 75 diesel engine, it emits between 109-111g/km of CO2 (varies depending on wheel size), while the BlueHDi 100 produces between 112-115g/km depending on spec. Opt for the Long version and this creeps up to 113-117g/km. The BlueHDi 75 was only available in the smaller Standard body form.

The most powerful BlueHDi 130 produces between 113-115g/km with the manual gearbox, and between 113-114g/km with the eight-speed automatic. This goes up to 116-118g/km and 117-119g/km repectively on the Long version.
The 1.2-litre PureTech 110 petrol engine emits 123g/km in regards to CO2 emissions. Choose the Long version and this goes up to 127g/km.

Servicing and maintenance costs

The Rifter shouldn’t cost too much to maintain, either, using engines found in almost every other Peugeot model, which should reduce costs when it comes to replacement parts and servicing.

Insurance costs should also be low, especially compared with more desirable SUVs that do the same job as the Rifter.

Is it reliable?

  • Early days to comment on reliability
  • Feels solidly built and like it’ll last
  • Many parts are used in other cars

The Peugeot Rifter is very new, so it’s hard to tell how reliable it’ll prove to be long-term. The signs are good, though, as many mechanical components are used elsewhere in Peugeot, Citroen, DS and Vauxhall vehicles, and overall the Rifter feels like it’s well-built.

There are some questionable parts when it comes to interior quality where different plastics meet on the dashboard, but overall there shouldn’t be anything to be too worried about.

Peugeot Rifter 2018 front grille

Ongoing running costs

Road tax (12 months) £145
Insurance group 8 - 15
How much is it to insure?