Parkers overall rating: 3.6 out of 5 3.6

Interior
3.9/5

How is the quality and layout?

The Toyota Land Cruiser’s interior is as no-nonsense as its exterior. The emphasis here is on physical controls – while there is a touchscreen infotainment system, you’ll find chunky, easy-to-hit buttons for the climate control and a panel of off-road switchgear underneath it.

While the dashboard is decidedly old-fashioned compared to the screen-heavy environment you’ll find behind the wheel of a Land Rover Defender (there’s even an LCD clock) it’s very easy to use and the layout makes perfect sense.  

The centre stack is a little busy, though, with the off-road panel at the bottom, climate controls above that and the infotainment touchscreen crowning it all.

As you might hope for from a Toyota, quality is absolutely top-notch. There’s not a single squeak or rattle from the Land Cruiser’s interior and there’s a real sense of nuclear bunker-style solidity to the way everything’s screwed together. Top-spec models get a rather quaint wood finish to some elements, which seems a little out of place. And there’s no denying similarly priced rivals do feel more luxurious.

Infotainment and tech

You won’t find fully-digital dashboards or touch-sensitive gubbins here – the Land Cruiser’s sole concession to the modern world is its infotainment touchscreen, which measures 9.0-inches across. It’s sited nice and high up to make visibility and interaction easy and so that you don’t have to take your eyes too far off the road.

The touchscreen itself is responsive, though the software it runs is clunky, awkward to use and difficult to navigate. Thankfully, Toyota has finally installed Apple CarPlay and Android Auto functionality, allowing you to connect up your phone and bypass the standard interface.

Equipment
Rating: 4.1/5

Two trim levels are available – Active or Invincible. The latter commands a significant premium of more than £13,000 over the entry-level car, but comes with a large amount of extra equipment.

All models of Land Cruiser now come with Toyota’s infotainment touchscreen with smartphone connectivity – entry-level models before the 2020 facelift only came with a fairly basic radio unit. You’ll need the top-spec Invincible car for sat-nav, but a smartphone system is superior anyway so this is no great loss.

All models also come with keyless entry and start, rear parking sensors and a reversing camera, multi-zone climate control, cruise control, and DAB radio.

Invincible grade piles on the luxury features. You’ll find the seats and steering wheel heated and electrically adjustable, while the former are also ventilated. There’s adaptive cruise control, all-round LED lights and a raft of extra safety kit (covered in the Safety section of this review), plus some items you might not have even considered such as a fridge under the centre armrest and a 240V mains socket in the rear.

In addition its larger wheels, side steps, privacy glass and black-painted front grille surround give it a different look to its entry-level sibling.