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View all Audi Q3 reviews
Parkers overall rating: 4 out of 5 4.0

Showing its age, but still a capable mini-SUV

Audi Q3 (11-18) - rated 4 out of 5
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PROS

  • Compact exterior dimensions
  • Solid, high-quality interior
  • Wide range of engines and trims
  • Classy and refined

CONS

  • Interior design showing its age
  • Cramped rear seats
  • High boot access
  • A little dull to drive

PROS

  • Compact exterior dimensions
  • Solid, high-quality interior
  • Wide range of engines and trims
  • Classy and refined

CONS

  • Interior design showing its age
  • Cramped rear seats
  • High boot access
  • A little dull to drive

Audi Q3 rivals

BMW
X1
4 out of 5 4.0
Skoda
Yeti
4.4 out of 5 4.4

Since the Q3 was first launched in 2011, newer versions of the ever-popular Q5 and Q7 have come along, and the smaller Q2 has been introduced to fulfil the desire for compact crossovers.

That doesn’t necessarily mean the Q3 is old news, but with competition coming thick and fast from all directions, it needs to stand up to the likes of the BMW X1, Mercedes-Benz GLA, MINI Countryman and cheaper alternatives like the Volkswagen Tiguan and SEAT Ateca.

The Q3 has been a sales success for Audi, but is it still good enough to see off the ever-increasing number of rivals in one of the fastest-growing segments of the car market?

Plenty of engine and transmission choices

Luckily for potential Q3 buyers, there’s a wide range of petrol and diesel engines available, from a 1.4-litre TFSI petrol with technology that shuts down cylinders to boost efficiency, to a powerful 2.0-litre turbodiesel that you’ll also find in cars like the Volkswagen Golf and SEAT Leon.

Six-speed manual gearboxes and S tronic automatics are available with six or seven speeds depending on the engine it’s mated to, while Quattro four-wheel drive is available on the most powerful 2.0 TFSI petrol, or any of the diesels.

Solid interior showing its age

Many of the interior fixtures and fittings are shared with the Audi A1, another of Audi’s oldest models in its current range.

While that’s no issue in terms of quality – everything feels beautifully screwed together – Audi is perhaps its own worst enemy in this regard because the cabins of its more recent models are so exquisitely designed and built.

Still, the materials used look and feel expensive, and you can still add plenty of extras to the inside to make it feel more upmarket, in line with its wide variety of rivals.

Hampered by pricey options

The Q3 isn’t cheap to buy in the first place, and it’s easy to hike up the price by delving into the extensive options list.

Adding more desirable equipment to your Q3 can easily send the price soaring towards £40,000, depending on the model you start off with. Bear in mind a bigger, newer Q5 is available at this kind of cost, so it’s good to compare what you get for the money when you’re buying. 

Audi Q3 rivals

BMW
X1
4 out of 5 4.0
Skoda
Yeti
4.4 out of 5 4.4

Other Audi Q3 (2011 - 2018) models: