Parkers overall rating: 4 out of 5 4.0

Miles per pound (mpp) Miles per pound (mpp)

Diesel engines 6.9 mpp
Low figures relate to the least economical version; high to the most economical. Based on WLTP combined fuel economy for versions of this car made since September 2017 only, and typical current fuel or electricity costs.

Fuel economy

Diesel engines 34.0 mpg
  • Some models thirstier than others
  • Too soon for definite used values
  • Prices not yet confirmed, so Benefit in Kind rates unknown

Unfashionable as it may be to say so, the conventional diesels in the Mercedes-Benz GLE Coupe line-up could be seen as the most appealing from a financial point of view. With realistic fuel consumption in the high 30s, you can easily top 500 miles from a tank of diesel.

The petrol AMG 53 should give you figures in the high 20s or low 30s. It’s a mild hybrid, but Merc’s priority here is delivering high performance in a smooth, efficient way, rather than offering high mpg as such.

Mercedes-Benz GLE Coupe charge port 2020

The plug-in hybrid, the 350 de, is a trickier proposition. If you can charge it regularly, allowing the electric motor to play a significant role in every journey, then you can expect sensational fuel consumption figures. If you drive with care, and start with a full battery, you can get about 60 miles on electricity alone. If you’d rather put your foot down, you can drive at up to 99mph on the battery, albeit not for 60 miles. Most of the time, the car’s algorithms will decide how best to juggle diesel and electricity. It’s close to seamless.

If, however, you can’t charge it so frequently, then you’ll sometimes be lugging around 400kg of extra hardware (battery, motor, plus the associated cooling and charging equipment), and could easily get worse mpg than with the regular diesels.

Ongoing running costs

Road tax (12 months) £475
Insurance group 49 - 50
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