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This car has been superseded by a newer model, click here to go to the latest Nissan Juke SUV review.

Parkers overall rating: 3.5 out of 5 3.5

Compact dimensions and quirky eye-catching design for Nissan’s smallest SUV

Nissan Juke SUV (10-19) - rated 3.5 out of 5
Enlarge 54 photos

PROS

  • Unusual styling still looks eye-catching
  • Feels compact and useful around town
  • Generous standard equipment list 
  • Frugal 1.5-litre diesel engine

CONS

  • Firm ride on models with larger wheels
  • Some interior quality issues
  • Cramped and claustrophobic in the back
  • Underwhelming petrol engine

At a glance

New price £15,190 - £20,800
Lease from new From £212 per month
Used price £2,945 - £15,635
Used monthly cost £73 - £386
Fuel economy 37 - 70 mpg
Road tax cost £20 - £235
Insurance group 8 - 26 How much is it to insure?
New

PROS

  • Unusual styling still looks eye-catching
  • Feels compact and useful around town
  • Generous standard equipment list 
  • Frugal 1.5-litre diesel engine

CONS

  • Firm ride on models with larger wheels
  • Some interior quality issues
  • Cramped and claustrophobic in the back
  • Underwhelming petrol engine

Nissan Juke SUV rivals

Mazda
CX-3
4.2 out of 5 4.2
Peugeot
2008
3.5 out of 5 3.5

The Nissan Juke is one of the cars that really popularised the genre of supermini-sized SUVs when it launched back in 2010. Riding on the success of the larger Qashqai, the Juke has sold well through the near-decade it’s been on sale. This is despite the market changing hugely – while at launch, it had barely any rivals, now it has many. Talented cars such as the Peugeot 2008, Renault Captur, SEAT Arona and Mazda CX-3 all compete with the Juke – and as more modern vehicles, they tend to beat it at its own game.

We’d never claim that you can’t teach an old dog new tricks, but the Juke’s beginning to show its age, and its quirky looks do hide rather arthritic hips. A cramped interior, poor engine line-up and lack of high-tech equipment do stand out among the superbly spacious and connected competition, but the Juke’s strong combination of generous standard equipment, a car-like driving position and the mad styling do still appeal.

SUV-like driving position

A big appeal to Juke buyers – and indeed to most who are considering a compact SUV – is the high-set driving position. Not only does it allow you to feel as though you’re lording it over other traffic, it aids forward visibility and can make it easier to get into and out of the car. In this respect, it’s easy to see why the Juke appeals, as it’s very comfortable for those in the front with a high hip point and supportive seating.

Nissan Juke interior

The same can’t really be said for those in the rear. Not only do they have to contend with small doors and an overall lack of space, the sloping roofline and small rear windows mean it feels rather dark and claustrophobic.

Hangs on well in the corners

The Juke corners like a much lower car – it grips determinedly and is capable of carrying a surprising amount of speed on a twisting road. While the bonkers Nismo model capitalised on this with plenty of power, it’s since been discontinued and the Juke makes do without any kind of ‘performance’ model to make the most of its fine handling.

The payoff for all that isn’t ideal, either, as the Juke has a very firm ride at any speed. It transmits lumps and bumps to the cabin, making life uncomfortable for the occupants even with the excellent seats. It also means the Juke isn’t very comfortable for long trips, and you’ll likely tire of its jittery motorway ride fairly quickly.

Limited engine range  

There's a choice of just two engines - a 1.6-litre petrol with 112hp and a 1.5-litre dCi diesel with 110hp. The 1.6 feels old and a bit lacking, especially compared with turbocharged engines in newer rivals. If you're buying a used Juke, however, there are several more options available, including turbocharged 1.2 and 1.6-litre DIG-T units that used to fit in the Qashqai, too. 

Nissan Juke Nismo RS

It's not available from new any more, but you might be able to find a good example of the Juke Nismo RS on the used car market. It packed more punch and had an even wilder look with lots of body kit, with red trimmings and sports seats inside. The RS was fitted with an even more powerful 1.6-litre petrol engine producing 218hp and 280Nm of torque. It’s available in front-wheel drive form with a manual gearbox, or four-wheel drive with a CVT automatic and a detuned 214hp, 250Nm motor.

So how does the Juke compare to its rivals nearly a decade on from launch? Read on to find out...

Nissan Juke SUV rivals

Mazda
CX-3
4.2 out of 5 4.2
Peugeot
2008
3.5 out of 5 3.5

Other Nissan Juke (2010 - 2019) models: