Parkers overall rating: 4 out of 5 4.0
  • Two screens
  • Lots of technology
  • Great use of colour, but slightly drab

Stepping inside the cabin, and you're greeted with a thin steering wheel that feels a little basic compared to the chunky offerings in rivals. Peer behind that, though, and the 10.25-inch digital cluster will wow you. It's standard on the i20 and shows the usual information you'd find in old fashioned binnacles, like mph and rpm.

The display is very high-res and modern feeling - but the impressive thing is that it's customisable. By delving into the menus you can change what information you see, as well as how it's displayed.

Changing the drive modes elicits different menus and colours depending on which mode you're in. For instance, Eco is a calm silver colour, while Sport is red. This display doesn't give drivers the option of a sat-nav map like in the Volkswagen Polo.

Cast your eyes left of the instruments display, and you'll see another large LCD in the form of the infotainment system. SE Connect cars get an 8.0-inch display, whereas Premium and Ultimate spec cars get a 10.25-inch screen.

Both are good, and easy to use. But there's no escaping that the larger display has more of a wow factor.

All cars come with Apple CarPlay/Android Auto. However, SE Connect cars come with wireless Apple CarPlay/Android Auto - but the other specs don't. This is because the Premium and Ultimate cars have sat-nav inbuilt, and there's an issue with the sat-nav provider and Apple/Google. Hyundai says it is working on this and there will soon be a solution.

Below the infotainment are the heating controls. Unlike some modern cars, Hyundai has kept these to physical buttons and dials. We find this a much simpler and easier solution to swiping through menus on touchscreens.

All the buttons are logically laid out and we found everything we were searching for within a minute or so. The buttons that control the lights are below the steering wheel on the right, and can be ordered in a contemporary beige/eggshell colour that helps keep the car up to date.

Unfortunately, to the right of this you'll find the door handle - which feels very cheap. In fact, all the plastic below this feels pretty nasty too - like the door bins for instance.

Still, it seems that Hyundai has spent money on what customers want (technology) and not on what they don't particularly care about - e.g. bits of plastic they rarely touch.

The driving position is easy to get comfortable with, while the view out is good too. The view behind isn't as good because of the way the body arcs up towards the rear - however, the rear parking camera is good enough to make up for this. We should mention that there's no lumbar adjustment - but the seat is naturally comfortable enough for most people anyway.

The seats feel and look cheap, especially in the rear, which is dark because of the way the rear windows are shaped. As mentioned in the Practicality section, space in the back is enviable - but would it have killed Hyundai to make it less drab in here for occupants?

Comfort

Good news here - the i20 is a very comfortable car. At low speeds, it does its best to smooth out pockmarked UK roads. The steering is light too - perfect for maneuvering around town, and in and out of car parking spaces.

Bung it into a roundabout too quickly, and you will feel significant bodyroll. But, at normal speeds, under normal circumstances, there's very little to complain about.

Raise the speed to a motorway jaunt and the i20 performs equally as well. Wind noise remains hushed, and it's a comfortable cruiser.

SE Connect spec cars with 16-inch alloy wheels are the most comfortable. More expensive cars, with 17-inch wheels do feel brittler at lower speeds, with a bit more unpleasant feedback through the seat and steering wheel.

From launch, there's only one engine - a 1.0-litre mild hybrid. There's more about this in the engine section, but we will say it makes for a quiet and capable companion in the i20. It's quiet under 4000rpm, but begins to pick up a bit of noise as you ask more of it.