Five cost-effective coupes

  • Use our Cost of Motoring tool to compare running costs
  • Drive Peugeot's RCZ for £1,301 less than a Citroen C4
  • Save £4,760 owning an Audi TT instead of a BMW 3-Series

Coupes have always been desirable, despite the practical problems that can arise from only having two doors.

They also used to command big premiums, as the coupes tended to be the range-topping models with the biggest engines and most expensive upmarket options.

These days, however, most manufacturers offer a range of coupes to suit all budgets and uses. We've rounded up some examples to show just how cost-effective some can be compared to normal saloons or hatchbacks.

All figures are based on 10,000 miles a year, for a period of three years

Audi TT vs. BMW 3-Series

With its sporting appearance and premium badge you might be surprised to find that the TT costs £1,595 less than a BMW 3-Series, a common choice for those looking for a compact executive saloon.

The TT also costs £3,165 less to run, thanks to much stronger residuals, meaning that over the three years you'll save a total of £4,760 by driving Audi's TT - a classy and well built coupe that comes with an economical diesel engine as well as four-wheel drive. 

You're not compromising on the performance front, either. The Audi will do 0-60mph in 7.3 seconds, compared to the BMW's 7.6 second time. The TT's economy is marginally worse, however - the BMW will average 58mpg but the TT can manage a still-impressive 53mpg.

 

 


Audi TT 2.0 TDI Quattro Sport 2dr


BMW 3-Series 320d M Sport 4d

Cost new: £28,300 £29,895
Depreciation: £13,525 £17,500
Showroom tax/Registration: £170 £55
Servicing: £1,638 £1,398
Road tax: £230 £190
Fuel: £3,641 £3,226
Total running costs: £19,204 £22,369


Which car costs less?  The Audi TT, by £4,760

Honda CR-Z vs. Toyota Auris HSD

Toyota's Auris is one of the more conventional hybrids, offering a claimed 70mpg average. It isn't, however, a particularly interesting car to drive, so if you're looking for something 'green' but with a little more character then you could consider Honda's CR-Z.

It does cost £79 more to run over three years but it's priced at £1,160 less than the Auris. That means buying and owning the CR-Z will save you £1,081 overall.

The CR-Z is also faster than the Auris and benefits from a conventional manual transmission, making it more engaging, and potentially less tiring, to drive. It's even got a set of rear seats, albeit very cramped ones, meaning you still can carry four passengers if needed.

 

 

Honda CR-Z 1.5 IMA Sport Hybrid 3dr

Toyota Auris HSD Auris T4 5dr

Cost new: £18,735 £19,895
Depreciation: £10,830 £11,925
Showroom tax/Registration: £55 £55
Servicing: £929 £452
Road tax: £40 £0
Fuel: £3,285 £2,628
Total running costs: £15,139 £15,060


Which car costs less?  The CR-Z by £1,160

Volvo C30 vs. Vauxhall Astra

Volvo's C30 offers sensible running costs and good economy, with the D2 diesel version returning a wallet-friendly 65mpg. There's even comfortable room for four but the boot is is a bit small and impractical.

The Volvo comes with a similar level of equipment as found in the new Vauxhall Astra with both featuring air-con, central locking, alloy wheels and cruise control. The Volvo is slightly faster and capable of averaging 3mpg more than the Vauxhall.

Although it has premium pretensions the C30 costs £1,650 less than a similar-specification Vauxhall Astra and you'll also save £2,021 in running costs over three years. Admittedly it's much less practical but if you're not looking for masses of boot space then the C30 could stand to save you £3,671 in total.

 

 

Volvo C30 D2 Sports Coupe SE 3dr

Vauxhall Astra 1.7 CDTi SE 5dr

Cost new: £20,210 £21,860
Depreciation: £12,325 £15,135
Showroom tax/Registration: £55 £55
Servicing: £2,118 £1,180
Road tax: £60 £60
Fuel: £2,937 £3,086
Total running costs: £17,495 £19,516


Which car costs less?  The Volvo C30, by £3,671

Peugeot RCZ vs. Citroen C4

The Peugeot RCZ is a stunning looking car that's fun to drive and surprisingly practical. There's seating for four, lots of equipment and a large boot that offers more space than a Scirocco or TT.

If you'd been looking at French cars then you may well have been considering the Citroen C4 hatchback, which costs £390 more than the RCZ in a similar specification. As well as being more expensive to buy, the C4's also £911 more expensive to run over three years despite it having an economical diesel engine.

This means you could save a total of £1,301 by buying and driving the RCZ, which is a great looking sports car with a lively petrol engine. It's a tough life.

 

 


 Peugeot RCZ 1.6 THP Sport 2dr


Citroen C4 2.0 HDi Exclusive 5dr

Cost new: £21,255 £21,645
Depreciation: £11,120 £13,970
Showroom tax/Registration: £220 £55
Servicing: £1,580 £891
Road tax: £330 £190
Fuel: £4,380 £3,435
Total running costs: £17,630 £18,541


Which car costs less?  The Peugeot RCZ, by £1,301

Volkswagen Scirocco vs. Mazda 3

The Volkswagen Scirocco is a uniquely styled coupe that benefits from great handling and a range of excellent engines. In 1.4-litre TSI specification, as shown here, it can average 44mpg.

Despite having a smaller engine than the similarly priced Mazda 3 hatchback, it's actually faster to 60mph - 9.4 seconds as opposed to 10.1 seconds. Both are involving cars but the Scirocco is definitely the more enjoyable and rewarding car to drive.

The Scirocco costs £570 more to buy than the Mazda but it'll save you £1,519 in running costs over three years compared to the Mazda 3. That means you'll end up saving a total of £949, not bad considering you'll be driving a premium Volkswagen coupe.

 

 

VW Scirocco 1.4 TSI 122 3dr

Mazda 3 2.0 Sport 
i-Start 5dr

Cost new: £19,575 £19,005
Depreciation: £11,120 £12,150
Showroom tax/Registration: £185 £220
Servicing: £1,057 £1,164
Road tax: £260 £330
Fuel: £4,199 £4,476
Total running costs: £16,821 £18,340


Which car costs less?  The Volkswagen Scirocco, by £949

Note: The Cost of Motoring tool is updated constantly so the figures may change according to market conditions.

Parker's Top Tip

You can compare both new and used car running costs by using our Cost of Motoring tool. If you're maybe  thinking about changing your car then find out what it's worth by getting a Used Car Valuation, and you can research the replacement cars that might interest you in our New Car Reviews section.