Parkers overall rating: 3.9 out of 5 3.9
  • Cabin feels solid and well-built
  • Good driving position with a supportive seat
  • Reasonable quality touchscreen

Take away the brightly-coloured trims on some models and the Kona's interior isn't quite as interesting as the outside. There's quite a range of materials used, and while it doesn't feel cheap, it also doesn't feel as nice as a Skoda Kamiq or Renault Captur inside. You'll need to go for one of the higher-spec models for a nicer feel inside, but this can end up being pricey. 

This differs from models such as the Nissan Juke where you can get large swathes of colour, such as the huge transmission tunnel – which can be specified in numerous highlighter-grade hues. Quality inside is good, if not class-leading. It all feels solid and like it’ll last a long time though, but there aren’t many softer-touch materials and it can feel quite grey and unexciting. Most crossover drivers will be perfectly happy with the interior of the Kona, but if you expect the personalisation options to provide you with a zany, high-vis finish, you may be disappointed here. 

On the other hand, the Kona's dash layout lends itself to being very easy to use. The dash-mounted infotainment screen is one of the easiest to use in the business, with helpful shortcut buttons either side. The introduction of the Kona Hybrid also brought an updated 10.25-inch media screen with brighter, crisper display and more functions. It really lifts the Kona's interior. 

Hyundai's sat-nav, however, often seems keen to zoom out between sat-nav instructions, making it hard to simply glance at the map to work out the next direction. Similarly, connecting a phone to use the Apple CarPlay (above) or Android Auto connectivity works reasonably well, though the map isn’t as clear as it could be, meaning you have to be a little more on your toes to keep on top of where you’re going from the map alone.

There are also numerous buttons on the steering wheel to take advantage of much of the standard equipment. The sheer number makes it tricky to quickly select the button you want by feel, but you’d quickly get used to this when living with the car. Aside from these, there are few other controls on the dashboard, making these easy to navigate when driving. Hybrid models get access to Hyundai's BlueLink app. This essentially allows owners to adjust the air con/heating, or lock/unlock their car remotely via an app on their phone.

Is it comfortable?

  • Comfortable seats
  • Decent refinement
  • Tightly controlled ride quality

We found the front seats particularly well designed, with plenty of side and back support and electric lumbar adjustment for providing greater support for your lower back – on all bar the entry-level model. Whatever shape or size you are, therefore, you should be able to find a comfortable driving position. In fact, it's the lower-spec models with cloth seats which offer the most comfortable seats. 

The suspension differs depending on what powertrain you go with. With petrol powered cars, it's stiffer than many of its rivals' set-ups. It's firm, and you notice it on roads that aren't well maintained and full of potholes. It's never too uncomfortable, but it's certainly a slightly harsher ride than something like a SEAT Arona or Renault Captur. Overall refinement levels are particularly high for the 1.0-litre, too, with little wind or engine noise being audible in the cabin, even at motorway speeds.

It's a different story for the 1.6-litre petrol version. The ride feels a little less smooth, and when accelerating hard the engine becomes extremely coarse for a brand new car. The engine feels well below par.

The Hybrid is a different kettle of fish. It's extremely hushed in town driving, but accelerating hard onto a motorway brings with it lots of revs and noise from the engine. The gearbox, like the engine, is a joy when not being used harshly. But it is sudden and jerky when you want to get a move on.