Parkers overall rating: 4.8 out of 5 4.8
  • Set out like the 720S with speedy revisions
  • Alcantara and carbonfibre everywhere
  • Optional engine porthole and roof scoop

The 765LT is broadly similar to the 720S in layout – the cabin is still built around an 8.0-inch central infotainment screen driver display that can be folded away for a pure minimalist aesthetic.

In the centre stack you’ll find the familiar toggle switches in the Active Dynamics Panel for drive modes, adjusting the engine and handling, plus buttons for the active aero and auto/manual gearshift.

From there though things start to look a little different – the air conditioning and audio system have been replaced by swathes of Alcantara and carbon fibre, plus you can pick a double-glazed porthole in the luggage shelf that peers into the engine bay.

McLaren’s also shaved millimetres off the side window and windscreen thickness to save weight, while the rear pillar and windscreen have been replaced by racey polycarbonate. Finally there’s the option of a roof scoop (like the one on the 620R) to enhance the sound of the engine’s intake.

Comfort

  • More of a performance focus than 720S
  • Noisier cabin is great on a circuit
  • Clever suspension offers range of modes

Stiffer engine mounts, less noise reduction material and thinner windows are responsible for a much more visceral driving experience, and also an increase in the levels of noise and vibration, depending on which way you want to look at it.

On a race track this will be music to your ears, but on the M1 heading north? Potentially not. The 720S made a good case for being a brilliant all-rounder, particularly its long-legged GT alter-ego, but the 765LT is much more focussed.

We’re not saying you wouldn’t want to daily one, just that of the two cars, the more extreme Longtail comes with a few compromises in terms of long range ability.

We’ve not driven one on the road yet by the 765LT retains the clever diagonally linked suspension of the 720S, which offered a very comfortable ride. This car has been lowered and stiffened though, so we’d expect that to have been slightly degraded.

You can also pick a set of seats taken straight from the Senna, saving 18kg a side thanks to a clever construction using a double-skin of carbon fibre with padding stuck on the vital areas. These make the experience feel immediately very special, particularly when paired with racing harnesses, and are surprisingly comfy despite their appearance.