Parkers overall rating: 4.6 out of 5 4.6

The Parkers VerdictShould you buy a Porsche 718 Cayman?

Absolutely. The 718 Cayman is that rare thing: a high-quality sports car that’ll thrill when you’re in the mood, and just get on unobtrusively with the business of driving from A-B when you’re commuting. It’s the perfect everyday supercar.

You don't even have to spend the most amount of money to get one that will reward you as a driver. Granted, Porsche will certainly oblige if you want the best model, or if you want a bespoke one to your own specification. But we're pleased to report that even if you bought an entry-level model, you won't be left disappointed when it comes to driving fun.

We would urge you to add some key options if you're using it every day. Things like parking sensors and cruise control should be standard-fit, we think, and will make life that little bit easier. How far you want to go regarding other performance-enhancing equipment comes down to your personal preference. It's unlikely lowered suspension will really benefit you if you're commuting in a Cayman, but the PDK automatic transmission will make things easier. The manual is lovely and involving, but can be quite heavy in its operation. If it's a weekend car, though, it's worth a try.

Engine-wise, the standard four-cylinder engines are very strong and provide excellent performance, despite what some enthusiasts may say as not being very Porsche (because they don't have six cylinders). The Cayman S is a fine blend of power, performance and usability without being overly pricey.

GTS vs GT4

While it might seem odd to talk about two cars from the same range in such twin-test terms, there’s a real argument here for which model is the ultimate Cayman.

In cold numbers terms you’ll pay an extra £10,000 for the GT4 in exchange for 20hp, one tenth off the 0-62mph run, and a whole host of aero and chassis upgrades that only really make a case for themselves on the track.

That’s not taking anything away from the GT4, which is a frankly brilliant car, but it does rather strengthen the case for viewing the GTS as something as a performance bargain. In relative terms, of course.

For pure road use with maybe an occasional track day we can’t think of a better all-rounder than the Cayman GTS (although a Lotus Exige does make a significantly better noise), making it easy to recommend over the more expensive GT4.

If you’re a frequent flier at your local race track though the GT4 is a no brainer, and actually starts to compete with the much more expensive 911 GT3, we think, so represents good value in its own slightly mind-boggling way.

Rear view of the 2018 Porsche Cayman GTS