4 out of 5 4.0
Parkers overall rating: 4 out of 5 4.0

Even more arresting to look at than ever

Jaguar F-Type Coupe (14 on) - rated 4 out of 5
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At a glance

New price £54,510 - £97,315
Used price £18,135 - £71,640
Fuel Economy 25.0 - 31.2 mpg
Road tax cost £305 - £580
Insurance group 41 - 50 How much is it to insure?
New

PROS

  • Sensational styling from every angle
  • Exciting handling across the range
  • Huge performance from the V8s

CONS

  • Ride quality can be harsh on largest wheels
  • Levels of interior quality are patchy
  • Bigger engines are frighteningly thirsty

Jaguar F-Type Coupe rivals

Written by Keith WR Jones on

The Jaguar F-Type has been refreshed for 2020, and as you can imagine, very little tinkering has been done to the car's most appealing asset – its classical good looks. The styling has been gently evolved: so you get the same fabulous proportions, and new maturity to the faintly Jaguar i-Pace-style front.

For those who think the F-Type is expensive, it's worth noting that the cost-effective P300 comes in at £54,060, which compares interestingly with the brilliant Alpine A110 at £50,800 in Legende specification and the Porsche Cayman T at £51,145. It still also successfully manages to offer buyers a cheaper alternative to the Aston Martin Vantage and Porsche 911 Coupe – which puts the F-Type in a unique position in the marketplace.

The big news is that the V6 is dead, its performance advantage over the turbo four insufficient to keep it alive. Instead the gap between the P300 2.0-litre four and the flagship all-wheel-drive 575hp R is home to a new 450hp supercharged V8 with a choice of four- or rear-wheel drive.

Facelift in 2019 brings revised interior and engine range

Inside, the cockpit gets a 12.3-inch digital driver display pinched from the i-Pace but running bespoke software and graphics. Configure it as you wish, from a giant central tacho flanked by secondary info displays through a more trad twin-dial arrangement to a full-screen map.

You now get Apple CarPlay and Android Auto – as well as a choice of two Meridian sound systems.

How practical is the Jaguar F-Type Coupe?

Observe the F-Type’s tapered silhouette in profile and you’ll appreciate that this is not the ideal companion when you’re flat-pack furniture shopping. Yes, there’s a long, narrow tailgate, but the bootspace within is shallow thanks to the mechanical components diverting power to the back wheels underneath. Think soft bags for weekends away, rather than gargantuan rigid cases.

In traditional Jaguar style, the two-seater cabin is snugly comfy rather than generously spacious, but there’s not a huge amount of space to pack away your in-car detritus. The cupholders are decently sized, though. Most of the materials your hands will explore feel of good quality, but this varies from surface-to-surface, plus the way it’s assembled isn’t going to give Porsche employees any sleepless nights.

How fast is it?

Even with an emotionally charged purchase, such as a high-end sports car, raw numbers can paint a very expressive picture. In terms of outright top speed, the slowest F-Type Coupe, powered by a turbocharged 300hp 2.0-litre engine can muster 155mph, while the flagship SVR and its supercharged 575hp 5.0-litre V8 can reach 200mph, with an addictively sonorous soundtrack to match.

Respectively, those two clobber the 0-62mph acceleration benchmark in 5.7 and 3.7 seconds. Self-evidently, it’s not slow. Should those polar opposites of the range be not quite what you’re looking for, there are a pair of 3.0-litre V6s – also supercharged – with 340hp and 380hp, together with a 550hp version of the 5.0-litre V8. All F-Type Coupes are fitted with an eight-speed automatic gearbox as standard, although the rear-wheel drive versions of the V6s can also be specced with a six-speed manual.

Power was sent exclusively to the rear wheels on all F-Types when it was launched, but that’s no longer the case on new ones: Jaguar’s all-wheel drive (AWD) system is standard on the V8s.

Is the Jaguar F-Type good to drive?

Make no mistake, this is one of the most entertaining sports coupes available. It lacks the outright purity of a comparable Porsche, but despite its modernity, there’s something of an old school charm about the way the F-Type handles, particularly the rear-wheel drive models.

These are significantly more playful – without being wayward – than the all-wheel drive (AWD) versions, allowing you to push hard through corners and feel the tail-end progressively step out of line. Given the power outputs in the upper echelons of the range, AWD arguably makes more sense given Britain’s often wet climate – certainly you can carry more speed – and tighter lines – through corners courtesy of the tyres’ extra adhesion. 

Uprated springs, dampers and anti-roll bars mean the F-Type handles better than its predecessor. The new F-Type was available to order from the beginning of December 2019 from £54,060 in the UK for a P300 Coupe rising to £102,370 for an R P575 Convertible.

Is the Jaguar F-Type worth considering as a sports coupe? Read the Parkers full review to find out

Jaguar F-Type Coupe rivals

Other Jaguar F-Type models: