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Parkers overall rating: 4.4 out of 5 4.4

Sets the standard for mid-sized SUVs – but at a price

Volkswagen Tiguan Review Video
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PROS

  • Excellent interior space
  • Easy to drive and manoeuvre
  • High quality interior
  • Lots of engine options      

CONS

  • Expensive compared with rivals
  • Not a true all-terrain car
  • Plain exterior styling
  • Some rivals better value

At a glance

New price £24,545 - £41,555
Lease from new From £268 per month
Used price £11,295 - £33,310
Used monthly cost £279 - £822
Fuel economy 38 - 60 mpg
Road tax cost £125 - £465
Insurance group 11 - 27 How much is it to insure?

PROS

  • Excellent interior space
  • Easy to drive and manoeuvre
  • High quality interior
  • Lots of engine options      

CONS

  • Expensive compared with rivals
  • Not a true all-terrain car
  • Plain exterior styling
  • Some rivals better value

Volkswagen Tiguan rivals

The Volkswagen Tiguan is a very well-established name when it comes to family SUVs. The first model was introduced in 2007, while the current, second-generation car arrived in 2016. The current model has rather more competition than its predecessor ever did, however – going up against the tide in one of the most crowded market segments in the business.

With talented rivals such as the SEAT Ateca, Kia Sportage, Mazda CX-5, Peugeot 3008 and Citroen C5 Aircross to name but a few, the Tiguan has its work cut out for it. Its job is made even more difficult by its positioning towards the top end of the market – bringing it into contention with premium offerings such as the Audi Q3 and Volvo XC40.

A classy, refined package

The Tiguan is very much like its lower-set siblings, the Golf and Passat. It shares those car’s engines and interior fittings, but it also shares their relaxed driving manners, excellent build quality and generally refined ambiance.

The interior’s really spacious thanks to the car’s long wheelbase (the distance between the wheels) and generally capacious bodywork. There’s lots of space for a family in here, though if five seats aren’t quite enough VW does sell the larger Tiguan Allspace, which has seven seats as standard. Better yet is how the Tiguan feels inside. There’s a pervading sense of quality, with satisfyingly well-damped switchgear and generally excellent material quality all round.

Refinement at speed is another highlight, and the Tiguan’s a seriously comfortable place to spend time in.

Wide engine lineup

There’s a broad selection of engines available in the Tiguan, most of which you’ll find in use in other Volkswagen Group products. On the petrol front, engines range in size from 1.5 to 2.0 litres in size, offering between 130 and 230hp. Front-and 4Motion four-wheel drive versions are available on some engines, as is the choice between manual and DSG automatic gearboxes.

VW Tiguan 2016 interior

Those who prefer diesel power are served by 2.0-litre TDI units, ranging between 115 and 240hp, again with front- and all-wheel drive on certain models and manual or DSG gearboxes. Not all engine and gearbox combinations are available in all trim levels, though. There's no official word yet, but we expected a Tiguan GTE plug-in hybrid (PHEV) to join the line-up at some point.

The Tiguan’s focus is on comfort rather than handling. Consequently it feels surefooted and agile, but not especially sporty – in many respects it feels reassuringly like a Volkswagen Golf to drive, albeit with an elevated driving position. The Tiguan’s blessed with a pleasingly rugged SUV appearance, with taut, perpendicular styling. It’s peppered with subtle-yet-interesting details, such as the light-catching indentations on the grille bars and the pronounced chamfering along the body, which wraps around to help frame the tail lights.

Trim levels and equipment

As you’d expect with a contemporary crossover, the Volkswagen Tiguan’s bristling with standard and optional technology. There’s a raft of electronic safety equipment including adaptive cruise control, emergency city braking and LED lights front and rear. You can also upscale the standard S, Match, SEL and R-Line Tech trims’ equipment rosters with several options including a panoramic glass roof, an adaptive digital instrument display and a high-quality Dynaudio stereo system.

Volkswagen’s also further honed its Active Control system allowing you to tailor your on-road driving for suppleness (Comfort) or firmness (Sport) depending on your personal tastes, as well as Snow and Off-Road modes when conditions are more challenging.

Is the VW Tiguan the SUV to go for? Read on to find out in the full Parkers review...

Volkswagen Tiguan rivals

Other Volkswagen Tiguan models: