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View all Volkswagen Tiguan reviews
Parkers overall rating: 4.4 out of 5 4.4

Sets the standard for mid-sized SUVs – but at a price

Volkswagen Tiguan Review Video
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PROS

  • Excellent interior space
  • Easy to drive and manoeuvre
  • High quality interior
  • Lots of engine options      

CONS

  • Expensive compared with rivals
  • Not a true all-terrain car
  • Plain exterior styling
  • Some rivals better value

PROS

  • Excellent interior space
  • Easy to drive and manoeuvre
  • High quality interior
  • Lots of engine options      

CONS

  • Expensive compared with rivals
  • Not a true all-terrain car
  • Plain exterior styling
  • Some rivals better value

Volkswagen Tiguan rivals

The Volkswagen Tiguan is an established name in the family SUV class, going up against strong competition like the Ford Kuga, Kia Sportage, Mazda CX-5, Peugeot 3008 and Hyundai Tucson. But as it sits at the higher end of the market, top-spec models also compete with premium offerings like the Audi Q3, BMW X1 and Volvo XC40 - at least on price. The Tiguan is a refined and comfortable family car with a high-quality and ergonomically-designed interior, a vast amount of space for those in the front and in the back, plus a big boot. 

Volkswagen Tiguan SUV: great for families and comfort

It’s no surprise to learn that the Volkswagen Tiguan’s mechanical components are shared with the similar SEAT Ateca and Skoda Karoq, but also the larger Kodiaq seven-seater. If you want a Tiguan with space for seven, there’s the Tiguan Allspace, which is almost a Kodiaq, but in a VW body, although it's not as spacious as the Czech alternative - especially in the third row.

Consequently it feels surefooted and agile, but not especially sporty – in many respects it feels reassuringly like a Volkswagen Golf to drive, albeit with an elevated driving position. The Tiguan’s blessed with a pleasingly rugged SUV appearance, with taut, perpendicular styling. It’s peppered with subtle-yet-interesting details, such as the light-catching indentations on the grille bars and the pronounced chamfering along the body, which wraps around to help frame the tail lights.

Not only is the cabin spacious thanks to the Tiguan’s increased overall length and wheelbase compared with its predecessor, up 60mm and 77mm, respectively, there’s an accompanying uplift in quality, too. Some of the plastics lower down the dashboard lack the same soft-touch nature of those on the upper plane, but it all feels well-assembled and the switchgear operates with a satisfyingly well-damped action.

VW Tiguan interior and dashboard

Volkswagen Tiguan engines: excellent TSI and TDI options

There’s a broad selection of engines available in the Tiguan, most of which you’ll find in use in other Volkswagen Group products. On the petrol front, engines range in size from 1.5 to 2.0 litres in size, offering between 130 and 230hp. Front-and 4Motion four-wheel drive versions are available on some engines, as is the choice between manual and DSG automatic gearboxes.

Those who prefer diesel power are served by 2.0-litre TDI units, ranging between 115 and 240hp, again with front- and all-wheel drive on certain models and manual or DSG gearboxes. Not all engine and gearbox combinations are available in all trim levels, though. There's no official word yet, but we expected a Tiguan GTE plug-in hybrid (PHEV) to join the line-up at some point.

The latest Tiguan’s noticeably more agile but doesn’t feel sporty to drive – comfort is its primary goal, especially when fitted with adaptive suspension. Its steering errs towards lightness and the relaxed nature of the DSG transmissions suits the VW better, too. Off-road it’s pleasingly capable: there’s 200mm of ground clearance on 4Motion Tiguans – 10mm more than front-wheel drive models – and the short front and rear overhangs allow it to deal with severe inclines with ease.

BUY: New and used Volkswagen Tiguan SUVs for sale

Volkswagen Tiguan trim levels and equipment

As you’d expect with a contemporary crossover, the Volkswagen Tiguan’s bristling with standard and optional technology. There’s a raft of electronic safety equipment including adaptive cruise control, emergency city braking and LED lights front and rear. You can also upscale the standard S, Match, SEL and R-Line Tech trims’ equipment rosters with several options including a panoramic glass roof, an adaptive digital instrument display and a high-quality Dynaudio stereo system. Volkswagen’s also further honed its Active Control system allowing you to tailor your on-road driving for suppleness (Comfort) or firmness (Sport) depending on your personal tastes, as well as Snow and Off-Road modes when conditions are more challenging.

Volkswagen Tiguan rivals

Other Volkswagen Tiguan models: