3.9 out of 5 3.9
Parkers overall rating: 3.9 out of 5 3.9

Brilliant value for money, much improved over old model

Dacia Sandero Stepway (21 on) - rated 3.9 out of 5
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At a glance

New price £10,995 - £14,595
Lease from new From £165 p/m View lease deals
Used price £9,070 - £12,255
Used monthly cost From £226 per month
Fuel Economy 45.6 - 50.4 mpg
Road tax cost £150
Insurance group 11 - 15 How much is it to insure?
New

PROS

  • Fantastic value for money
  • Spacious interior
  • Good to drive, comfortable ride

CONS

  • Price premium over standard Sandero
  • Lacks refinement on the motorway
  • Not much considering the price

Dacia Sandero Stepway rivals

Citroën
C3
4 out of 5 4.0

Written by Keith Adams on

For a carmaker that's only been around in its current form in the UK since 2013, Dacia has made a massive splash with more than 190,000 cars sold so far. It's established itself as the go-to budget brand, offering the cheapest car on sale, and basing its model range on tried-and-tested Renault technology.

What this means for you is that you can buy a cheap car and not settle for nasty - which is something that wasn't always the case when buying an entry-level car. The Sandero hatchback was launched as the cheapest car in the UK and remains so today, while the Stepway version is a jacked-up, ruggedised version, with SUV-like styling and functionality - and sold at a premium.

Of all Sandero sales, 60% go to the Stepway, which clearly shows that UK buyers like them. And we understand - it's chunky with car park-friendly-side cladding, and has a kerb-friendly ride height. For the 2021 version, the recipe remains the same - chunky lifestyle-orientated looks and attitude, but it's now based on the all-new Sandero, which is bang-up-to date in terms of technology.

Dacia Sandero Stepway rivals

The Stepway is cheap overall but expensive for a Sandero, with a price premium of almost £2,000 over similarly equipped and powered hatchback. Entry-level is the Essential model, which comes in at £10,995. This compares with £7,995 for the much more stripped-out Sandero Access and £9,170 for the equivalent Sandero Essential TCe 90.

If you're looking at the Sandero Stepway, the chances are you'll have already concluded that it doesn't have many rivals for the money. Go on price and you're looking at entry-level small cars, such as the Citroen C3, Skoda Fabia or the underrated Suzuki Ignis, or, for a little more SUV attitude, try a used example of the much more expensive Ford Fiesta Active or the now-discontinued Hyundai i20 Active.

If SUVs are your thing and you're on a budget, perhaps the bargain-priced MG ZS is another car on your list. But the Stepway undercuts all of the above in cash terms - it really is uniquely priced and specified for your money.

What's new about the 2021 Sandero Stepway?

It merely might look like a slightly sleeker version of the old one, but the 2021 Stepway really is all-new. Despite its familiar styling, you're getting a car that sits on the same platform as the current-generation Renault Clio and Nissan Juke and one that is powered by Renault's latest, most efficient engines. 

It's more or less the same size inside and out as the last one - so in terms of room for your money, it offers brilliant value. Think of it in terms of a Volkswagen Golf-sized car for significantly less money than a Polo. The 2021 model is instantly recognisable as it has a sleeker, lower stance than the old Stepway, has sharp-looking arrow-like Daytime Running Lights (DRLs) up front, and LED rear lights.

Dacia says the quality of the latest Stepway has improved markedly over the last one, too, and you can see that in the tighter panel gaps and shut lines. The paint finish and some of the detailing, such as the chrome-trimmed front grille, is also a vast improvement. We really do wonder how they do it for the price.

What models are available?

The Sandero Stepway range is refreshingly simple, and we like it for that. There are three models to choose from - Essential, Comfort and Prestige. They're all powered by the same three-cylinder Renault petrol engine also found in the Clio and Captur. You get the option of bi-fuel LPG, which has 100hp compared with 90hp for the petrol-only models. The Comfort and Prestige models are also offered with an extra-cost automatic transmission.

If you want options, there are but two to choose from - metallic paint and a spare wheel. If you want multiple personalisation options, a diesel engine, or plug-in hybrid you need to look elsewhere.

The bi-fuel option is interesting, though. These models carry an additional gas tank in the boot, and you can fill this up as a cleaner and cheaper alternative to petrol (LPG typically costs around 60% the amount of unleaded). The gas filler is located next to the petrol filler, and is simplicity itself to top up.

Your biggest challenge is finding a fuel station that stocks it... 

Click through the next few pages to read everything you need to know about the Dacia Sandero Stepway including its practicality, how much it costs to run, what it's like to drive – and whether we recommend buying one.

Dacia Sandero Stepway rivals

Citroën
C3
4 out of 5 4.0

Other Dacia Sandero models: