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Parkers overall rating: 3.8 out of 5 3.8

Practical family SUV is refined and good to drive

Honda CR-V SUV (18 on) - rated 3.8 out of 5
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PROS

  • Excellent practicality
  • Good to drive
  • Composed ride
  • Well-equipped 
  • Impressive hybrid model

CONS

  • Prices expected to increase
  • Limited space in seven-seat form
  • Very limited engine range
  • Not the most interesting

At a glance

New price £26,310 - £38,280
Lease from new From £282 per month
Used price £17,460 - £33,660
Used monthly cost £431 - £830
Miles per pound 5.4 - 7.0 mpp
Fuel economy 39 - 53 mpg
Road tax cost £135 - £145
Insurance group 22 - 25 How much is it to insure?

PROS

  • Excellent practicality
  • Good to drive
  • Composed ride
  • Well-equipped 
  • Impressive hybrid model

CONS

  • Prices expected to increase
  • Limited space in seven-seat form
  • Very limited engine range
  • Not the most interesting

Honda CR-V SUV rivals

Volkswagen
Tiguan
4.4 out of 5 4.4

The Honda CR-V is one of the world’s best-selling SUVs, so it’s safe to say that it’s one of the Japanese manufacturer’s most important cars. Having a volume seller in this segment is essential, and the sheer number of rivals the CR-V faces means it has a much tougher job to stand out than it did when it debuted back in the 1990s.

As demand for these cars has skyrocketed, so the competition has morphed from fairly rugged, unrefined off-roaders into comfortable family cruisers and shifted the humble hatchback from the nation’s affections. Just about every mainstream manufacturer offers a rival to the Honda CR-V – with vehicles such as the Nissan Qashqai, Peugeot 3008, Kia Sportage and Skoda Kodiaq offering the market everything from basic and budget-friendly transport to premium and luxurious family motoring.

Honda CR-V cornering

It’s somewhere in the middle of this that the CR-V sits - it stops short of offering the driver engagement of the SEAT Ateca or the premium interior fittings of a Volkswagen Tiguan, instead giving owners a hugely spacious interior, plenty of standard equipment and a reputation for excellent reliability and build quality.

No diesels here

The CR-V launched with a single petrol engine – a 1.5-litre turbocharged unit. Honda’s decision to ditch diesel entirely from the range was a bold one, and based on the fuel’s declining popularity.

But for those who miss the fuel economy of a diesel, there’s a Hybrid model on offer. This mates a 2.0-litre petrol with a pair of electric motors, and can offer up to 53.3mpg – a competitive figure compared with most diesel rivals.

Honda CR-V engine

The CR-V Hybrid launched in 2018 as part of Honda’s aim to electrify two-thirds of its European model range by 2025. It’s currently the only hybrid that the brand offers in Europe – apart from the remarkable NSX supercar, that is.

Front- or four-wheel drive on offer

Both petrol and Hybrid models can be chosen with two- or four-wheel drive, and while the CR-V is no off-roader many will be pleased with the extra security of having all four wheels driven. It’s worth mentioning also that ground clearance has increased by 35mm compared with the previous model, giving it slightly more kudos as a mud-plugger.

With petrol models, buyers can also choose between six-speed manual and CVT automatic gearboxes, while the hybrid is automatic-only.

Most UK buyers are expected to opt for the all-wheel drive manual model, though the efficient Hybrid should also take a fair portion of the sales. Regardless of powertrain, the CR-V is a composed and refined performer on the road. It’s not fast or thrilling, but is instead comfortable and impressively relaxing.

Practical with five or seven seats

Practicality is king in this segment, and the CR-V doesn’t disappoint – it has a very spacious cabin with plenty of room for families to stretch out.

Honda CR-V interior

For the first time, Honda’s offering a seven-seat CR-V, putting it in contention with the likes of the Peugeot 5008 and Nissan X-Trail. While the third row is compact, it’s a very useful addition – sadly, Hybrid models are five-seater only.

Regardless of seating arrangement, passengers in the first two rows have plenty of room. Three individual rear seats as opposed to a bench arrangement means there’s lots of flexibility, too, making the CR-V ideal for carrying awkward or bulky items.

There’s also a huge boot on offer, which is flat, wide, and easy to access.

Interested in this practical, comfortable SUV? Read on for our full review to find out more...

Read more: Honda CR-V vs Skoda Karoq, Peugeot 3008 & Hyundai Tucson

Honda CR-V SUV rivals

Volkswagen
Tiguan
4.4 out of 5 4.4

Other Honda CR-V models: