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View all Hyundai Tucson reviews
Parkers overall rating: 3.9 out of 5 3.9
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Dependable mid-size SUV, bit it lacks the wow factor

Hyundai Tucson (15 on) - rated 3.9 out of 5
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PROS

  • Stylish details, handsome design
  • Comfortable ride quality
  • Diesels are an economical choice
  • Impressive reliability record

CONS

  • Petrol choices make less sense
  • Several rivals are more practical
  • Cabin doesn’t feel that special

PROS

  • Stylish details, handsome design
  • Comfortable ride quality
  • Diesels are an economical choice
  • Impressive reliability record

CONS

  • Petrol choices make less sense
  • Several rivals are more practical
  • Cabin doesn’t feel that special

Verdict

Hyundai Tucson SUV introduction infographic

Replacing the ix35 and reviving the name that crossover’s predecessor had, is the Hyundai Tucson, a five-door, five-seater SUV that slots between the bolder Kona and Santa Fe models within the Korean marque’s range.

As such, it’s in direct competition with a multitude of other crossovers in a very competitive class, including the Ford Kuga, Nissan Qashqai, Peugeot 3008 and Renault Kadjar.

Hyundai Tucson: improvement over ix35

Hyundai fans will be pleased to see the firm is continuing its drive towards more distinctive styling and plusher interiors. While the Tucson is a major step forward compared with the ix35, especially in terms of the materials used in the cabin, it’s already off the pace of the newer i30 and Santa Fe ranges.

Nevertheless. we found it quiet, refined and fine to drive, with safe handling – it won’t sate enthusiastic drivers, but its light controls make it a doddle to pilot around town.

Hyundai Tucson SUV front three-quarter

There’s a wide range of engines on offer, including an efficient 2.0-litre diesel with a 48-volt mild-hybrid system introduced as part of the Tucson’s 2018 makeover. It’s not the most efficient option in the range, though – that honour belongs to the 136hp 1.6-litre CRDi diesel when fitted with the DCT dual-clutch automatic.

If diesels aren’t your thing, then there are naturally aspirated and turbocharged 1.6-litre petrols available.

Hyundai Tucson 2018 facelift

As makeovers go, the one Hyundai blessed the Tucson with in 2018 was at the milder end of the facelift spectrum.

From most angles there’s barely any difference, but it’s the front where it’s at its most obvious, where there’s a more crisply defined trapezoidal grille nestling between revised headlamps.

Hyundai Tucson SUV side elevation

Given the distinctive split-level front lighting on the Kona and Santa Fe SUVs, it’s a surprise that Hyundai opted not to give the Tucson a similarly distinctive face at the same time.

Hyundai Tucson: high levels of equipment

You have a choice of four trim levels, but as ever with Hyundai cars, each comes with a decent amount of kit for your cash.

Optional extras are available, but Hyundai prefers to guide its buyers towards the next specification grade up the hierarchy.

Hyundai Tucson SUV rear badge detail

It’s a safe car, too, achieving a full five-star rating when it was assessed by the experts at Euro NCAP. Of course, the test has been made more rigorous since then, so how the Tucson would perform now is unclear.

Further peace of mind will come courtesy of the firm’s five-year, unlimited mileage warranty, which not only ensures dealer support if something goes wrong, but props-up the resale value of the Hyundai.

The Parkers VerdictThe Parkers Verdict

While the Hyundai Tucson isn’t objectively the best mid-size five-seater crossover available, it nevertheless is a popular choice, with buyers smitten by its combination of high equipment levels, reasonably low running costs and the reassuring appeal of the long warranty.

Hyundai Tucson SUV rear three-quarters

Read on for the full Hyundai Tucson SUV review