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View all Vauxhall Corsa reviews

All-new supermini looks to be a real step-change from the old model

Vauxhall Corsa Hatchback (20 on) - rated 0 out of 5
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PROS

  • Stylish new design
  • Early driving impressions are good
  • Petrol, diesel and electric powertrains

 

CONS

  • New Peugeot 208 looks more desirable
  • No word of a VXR model yet
  • Too much PSA, not enough Vauxhall?

PROS

  • Stylish new design
  • Early driving impressions are good
  • Petrol, diesel and electric powertrains

 

CONS

  • New Peugeot 208 looks more desirable
  • No word of a VXR model yet
  • Too much PSA, not enough Vauxhall?

You’re probably aware by now that the 100+ year-old British brand Vauxhall has been sold, by its former American owner General Motors to French manufacturing group PSA.

This means that Vauxhall’s now a part of the same group that builds Peugeot, Citroen and DS models, and it’s why the new Corsa’s come to fruition in just a couple of years. It’s piggybacked onto the development of the Peugeot 208, with which it will share a platform and much of its technology – but to differentiate it from that car, it will be more conservatively-styled inside and out. And, for buyers who’ve had Vauxhalls for many years, that’s reassuring.

We’ve yet to drive a full production model of the new Vauxhall Corsa, but here’s what we know so far…

Wide range of powertrains

Along with the all-electric e-Corsa (which we’ll cover in a separate review) Vauxhall’s set to provide four powertrains for the new supermini. They consist of a 1.2-litre petrol in three states of tune – 75hp, 100hp and 130hp – and a sole 100hp 1.5-litre diesel. The 130hp petrol won’t arrive until later in the car’s lifetime, though, and even then its existence will be based on customer demand.

The diesel option is becoming a rarity in this market sector with many manufacturers deciding that a small diesel car is too much of a niche product to continue developing one. Though it’s likely to make up a tiny proportion of Corsa sales, this could be a real boon for high-mileage drivers who want exceptional fuel economy in a small car package.

The lion’s share of sales will probably go to the 100hp petrol, which looks set to provide a really useful blend of performance and economy.

Manual and automatic gearboxes will be available, the latter an eight-speed version used across Peugeot’s range of larger cars. An automatic gearbox this sophisticated isn’t a given on a supermini, and could be a dealmaker for those drivers who prefer self-shifters.

All Vauxhall on the inside

2019 Vauxhall Corsa interior

Vauxhall says that apart from the automatic gear shifter and paddles, everything owners touch and interact with is pure Vauxhall – not Peugeot or Citroen. That’s an important differentiation to make, as while the Peugeot 208 will offer a far more avant-garde and unconventional interior space, the Corsa’s simpler aesthetic will appeal to those who value ease-of-use over style.

The infotainment system will also be inherited from PSA, but Vauxhall’s retaining physical climate controls underneath it – again, that’s a different setup to the 208, and one that makes the Corsa easier to use than its French sibling.

Read on for everything we know so far about the latest Vauxhall Corsa, including our early impressions from driving a pre-production model.

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