3.5 out of 5 3.5
Parkers overall rating: 3.5 out of 5 3.5

Cheap to buy and run and easy to drive

Citroën C1 (14-22) - rated 3.5 out of 5
Enlarge 40 photos

At a glance

New price £12,955 - £14,445
Used price £2,585 - £12,990
Used monthly cost From £65 per month
Fuel Economy 51.6 - 58.9 mpg
Road tax cost £0 - £165
Insurance group 6 - 13 How much is it to insure?
New

PROS

  • Low running costs
  • Fun Airscape trim
  • Quite fun to drive in town

CONS

  • Engine can become noisy
  • Miserly spec on basic model
  • Small boot fit for singles only

Citroën C1 rivals

Volkswagen
Up
4.4 out of 5 4.4
Peugeot
108
3.5 out of 5 3.5
Toyota
Aygo
3.9 out of 5 3.9

Written by Keith Adams on

The Citroen C1 is the French firm’s smallest model in the range, sharing its mechanical parts with the Peugeot 108 and the more striking-looking Toyota Aygo. Despite sharing underpinnings, Citroen has still managed to inject some of its usual styling flair to the exterior, looking just as distinctive as many of its larger models. 

The C1 is popular with learner drivers, empty-nesters and everyone in between thanks to its nippy engine, fun drive and surprisingly roomy interior, not to mention its low price and running costs. Available with both three and five doors, it has the looks and charm to make its way on to the same shopping lists.

It does have plenty of competition, not only from the cars it shares its parts with, but also the Kia Picanto, Hyundai i10 and Volkswagen Up to name but a few. If you’re thinking of buying one, the model range is nice and simple with one 72hp petrol engine to choose from and three trim levels – Urban Ride, Shine and Shine Airscape.

It might be knocking on in years, but Citroen has played close attention to the fit, finish and quality of its baby car – all of the engineering was handled by Toyota, which means the C1 is the most solid city car from the French firm yet, defying the reputation for flimsiness that befell its products in the past.

Despite being an entry-level car, you can still equip it with a 7.0-inch infotainment system which includes radio, Bluetooth and an on-board computer. Other features include keyless entry, hill-start assist, climate control, heated seats, reversing camera and memory settings for the front seats on the equipment lists, although much of this costs extra.

To find out how the Citroen C1 compares to rivals, keep reading over the next few pages. We’ll cover off interior quality and equipment, practicality, what it’s like to drive, what it’ll cost you and which version we’d recommend. The most important question we’ll answer is whether you should take one over a Peugeot 108 or Toyota Aygo.

Citroën C1 rivals

Volkswagen
Up
4.4 out of 5 4.4
Peugeot
108
3.5 out of 5 3.5
Toyota
Aygo
3.9 out of 5 3.9