Parkers overall rating: 3.9 out of 5 3.9
  • Very well-assembled cabin
  • Pity the materials lack the wow factor
  • Light, but plasticky controls

For buyers progressing to a Hyundai Tucson from an older ix35, this is a marked step forwards for the Korean company. The steering wheel in particular feels of far better quality than the ix35, and that’s something you’re really going to appreciate.

What’s also clear is how much Hyundai has come on as a brand since the Tucson was launched. While the i30 isn’t exactly a paragon of interior design and plush tactility, it does feel streaks ahead of the older Tucson, even post-facelift.

You’re faced with a conventional arrangement with rev counter and speedo surrounding a small screen for trip computer or navigation information. The dials are very legible, as are the controls on the touchscreen in the centre of the dash – pity the graphics look off-the-pace.

The driving position is elevated – this is an SUV after all – but it sits low within the bodywork so you don’t feel like you’re sat with the gods. High-spec versions also have electric seat adjustment so it’s simple to find a comfortable driving position.

Just watch out for storing taller bottles in the front cup-holders: they foul access to the gear lever, which is especially frustrating in a manual car.

Is it comfortable?

  • Quiet interior ambience
  • Good standard seats
  • Ride quality is mainly good

Again, this is an area that’s been worked on at significant length by Hyundai at its testing and development premises in Europe and it shows. The result is that the Tucson is one of the brand’s comfiest products – it’s highly accomplished.

We found the seats to be good, if not quite at the plushness the Renault Kadjar enjoys. They’re very comfortable and supportive, and at higher trim levels are heated or even ventilated with an air-conditioned breeze.

It’s easy to get comfortable in the top-spec cars with electric adjustment of the seats, and found the cabin extremely quiet too – especially in terms of wind and road noise. The petrol engines are quieter than the diesels (providing you drive them gently), but the latter aren’t what you’d call loud either.

If you can avoid the larger alloy wheel sizes, you’ll appreciate the benefit there, too. The ride comfort is fine in the main, but those bigger rims can introduce an unsettling ripple to the Tucson’s balance, just taking the edge off its overall polish.

Also, if you spec a Tucson in N-Line trim with the petrol engine, it also comes with slightly stiffer suspension which can harm comfort slightly. We'd recommend the diesel version of this anyway, which does without this alternative set-up.